Summer Solstice Splash ‘n Cash Rafflecopter

by @AnnieDaylon

Rafflecopter over! Thanks so much for entering! ūüôā¬†

WELCOME!
Enter Splash ‘n Cash Rafflecopter for a chance to win $100! (No purchase necessary!)¬†

 

Summer Solstice
¬†Splash ‘n Cash Giveaway!

 

$100 Grand Prize
(Amazon Gift Card or PayPal Cash)

 

Sponsored by:

 

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Canada: Authors, Libraries, and the Public Lending Right Program

by @AnnieDaylon

Canadian Authors: Did you know that you could be compensated for having books in libraries in Canada? How? Through the Canada Council for the Arts Public Lending Right Program.

Canada book Public Lending Right Program

According to Wikipedia, a¬†Public Lending Right (PLR) program is a program “intended to either compensate authors for the potential loss of sales from their works being available in public libraries,¬†or as a governmental support of the arts, through support of works available in public libraries, such as books, music and artwork.”¬†Twenty-eight countries, including Canada, have such¬†programs.

In Canada, when books are purchased by ( not donated to) libraries, authors may receive compensation over and above the royalty. The compensation comes in the form of an annual payment from the Public Lending Right Program. 

ELIGIBILITY:
Who is eligible?
Canadian citizens who are illustrators, photographers, translators, anthology contributors, or editors with original written contributions are eligible.
What writing is eligible?
Works of poetry, fiction drama, children’s literature, nonfiction or scholarly work are eligible. (more details on eligibility here)
Which Libraries are eligible?
Every year the PLR chooses seven public library catalogues in each language group. According to the PLR website, ‚ÄúThe selection of public library catalogues takes into account the desire to include substantial collections and to represent the various regions of Canada.‚ÄĚ The list of eligible programs is not¬†broadcast in advance. This is for fairness and to prevent participating libraries from being inundated with purchasing requests from authors.

PARTICIPATION:
How Do Authors Participate?

To participate, authors must register. You will not receive compensation unless you are registered with the Public Lending Right Program. Registration is required annually, between mid-February and May first. 
You can go to the site now and request an email reminder about registration for 2017. (Registration Link)

PAYMENT:
There is a $50 threshold set for a PLR payment. (For details on the payment scale, go HERE>)
For me, this scale means that

  • If¬†the FVRL (the library system which¬†purchased two copies of one of my titles) is on the list for 2017, and If¬†I register in February of 2017, I get $50 for that year (payment is per title, not per book.)

  • If¬†I land that same title in another participating library system, I get $100. And so on and so on, to a maximum of $350.¬†

According to Peter Schneider, Manager of the Canada Council for the Arts Public Lending Right Program, the maximum paid to one Canadian author last year was $3500.

I’m in! How about you? Yes?
If you have titles in¬†Canadian libraries, then remember to REGISTER. If you don’t have titles in Canadian libraries, then start by applying to¬†the acquisitions librarian¬†in¬†your own community. (See previous blog post: How I Got My Indie Novel into the Library System.)

For more information go to: Public Lending Right Program

Do you have any comments about or experience with a Public Lending Right Program? Please share your comments, share this post, and share the wealth! All authors need this support.

Free Short StoryA free short story is yours when you join my email list! My newsletters contain book news, blog posts, sneak previews, and, occasionally, fun facts about my beloved island of Newfoundland. To join, place the required information in the space provided on the right. Rest assured your email address will not be shared for any reason. 

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How I Got My Indie Novel into the Library System

by @Annie Daylon

 

shutterstock_240133276

I had no idea that indie authors could apply to have books purchased by libraries. When the illustrator of my picture book mentioned it, I delved into research. When Stephanie Hopkins of IndieBRAG asked me to share my journey on their blog, I jumped at the chance.

Here’s a snippet:

At my local library, I spoke with the community librarian who gave me the contact information for the acquisitions librarian.
In my application email to acquisitions, I included:

  • a brief bio;

  • ¬†cover images of available titles (linked to Amazon);

  • ¬†mini-synopses;

  • ¬†website link; and

  • ¬†contact info.

When a couple of weeks passed with no response, I emailed again.
Still no reply.

SEE MORE HERE

ATT: Canadian Authors>>> Did you know that you can be compensated for having your books in (purchased by) Canadian Libraries? Check my next blog post (July 11, 2016) for details!


Free Short StoryA free short story is yours when you join my email list! My newsletters contain book news, blog posts, sneak previews, and, occasionally, fun facts about my beloved island of Newfoundland. To join, place the required information in the space provided on the right. Rest assured your email address will not be shared for any reason.

 

Many thanks to Stephanie Hopkins, BRAG Medallion, and the Fraser Valley Regional Library System!

My best to you,

Annie Signature Light Blue


 

The B.R.A.G. Medallion: A Boost for Indie Authors

by @AnnieDaylon

What is the B.R.A.G. Medallion?

The Book Readers Appreciation Group Medallion is an award bestowed for excellence in indie publication. Awards are given based on plot, characters, writing style, dialogue, copy editing, as well as cover and interior Layout.

registered- 800


BRAGMedallion.com is owned and operated by indieBRAG, LLC, a privately held organization that has brought together a large group of readers, both individuals and members of book clubs, located throughout the United States and in ten other countries around the globe.”
 ~  Who We Are at indieBRAG 

A B.R.A.G. Medallion is a boost for indie authors. In addition to 10 copies of a gold award sticker, honorees receive reviews on Amazon and Goodreads, mentions on Twitter, and pictures on Pinterest.

The B.R.A.G. website 
posts news from authors about their readings and publications and displays donated print copies at book expositions.

Recipients also receive an opportunity to do an interview about their winning work and their writing process (an opportunity I jumped at!) 
These interviews are conducted by Stephanie Hopkins at Layered Pages. 

An excerpt¬†for you, of¬†my B.R.A.G¬†interview …

“Hi, Annie! Thank you for visiting with me today to talk about your latest B.R.A.G. Medallion! First, tell me how you discovered indieBRAG?”

“Happy to be here! Thanks for the invite!

“I discovered indieBRAG¬†on Twitter when another author tweeted that she had received the B.R.A.G. medallion. I followed the indieBRAG link and, impressed with what I read, I submitted my novel, Castles in the Kerrigan Chronicles Indie Brag imageSand¬†which¬†became a B.R.A.G Medallion Honoree. Due to the numerous benefits of indieBRAG‚ÄĒAmazon and Goodreads ratings, tweets, Facebook feature, Pinterest posts, Stickers, and an interview with Layered Pages‚ÄĒI was eager to submit my current release Of Sea and Seed for indieBRAG recognition. I am thrilled to have received the honor a second time.”

“I must say, I adore your book title and cover. Please tell me a little about your story and the inspiration behind it.”

The Story…¬†Of Sea and Seed is set on the island of Newfoundland….”¬†

             Read More Here 

 Many thanks to IndieBrag and Interviewer Stephanie Hopkins! 

 Free Short Story
A free short story is yours when you join my email list! My newsletters contain book news, blog posts, sneak previews, and, occasionally, fun facts about my beloved island of Newfoundland. To join, place the required information in the space provided on the right. Rest assured your email address will not be shared for any reason.

My best to you, 

Annie Signature Light Blue

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Vancouver Visit: Things Are Not Always What They Seem

by @AnnieDaylon

Phone April 277

Things are not always what they seem…

 

Are you writing present-day fiction in a real setting? Are you wondering if you should visit that setting? 

In my last post,¬†My Novels. My Research., I wrote¬†of plans to visit the setting of my work-in-progress…

My Work-in-Progress is a crime thriller set in present day Vancouver… I have the characters and the details down, most of them anyway. But I want, once again, to walk in the shoes of my characters. This time I will take the¬†Aquabus to Granville Island, visit¬†a caf√© on the beach, shop¬†at Pacific Centre,¬† detail heritage buildings in the area, and, most importantly,¬†do some people watching.”

Here are a few things I discovered…

  1. First of all, since my story takes place in May, I wanted to visit in May. But, when I learned that hotel rates would skyrocket on May first (the onset of the tourist season), I booked my trip for the last week in April. Had I waited the extra week, my hotel cost would have doubled. Ouch!

  2. I didn’t ride the Aquabus mentioned in my last post. The character in my novel who went to the Farmers Market on Granville Island would have taken the False Creek Ferry because it was closer to her home and therefore much convenient for her. (Good to know!) I followed suit. 

  3. Before my trip to Vancouver, I watched a TV news report from the shores of English Bay. Certain that shutterstock_212016496the flowers dotting the background field were clover, I wrote about the scent of clover combined with the scent of sea, a combination I remember well from my days in Newfoundland. However, when I strolled through the grass near English Bay , I discovered that there was no clover. The tiny white flowers I saw were daisies. (Things are not always what they seem.) I edited my manuscript.

  4. In my novel, a main character visits police headquarters. When I wrote the scene (prior to my visit to VPD headquarters), I based the setting on a TV show, one in which the front doors of the police station open to a narrow reception area with a long, open counter manned by a prominent and dominant female officer. On that show, everything on and behind that counter is clearly visible (possibly to make it easier to film).
    Reality is different. At the VPD Headquarters, there is a long reception counter, yes, but it is separated from the public by (what I assume is) bulletproof glass. As is required of all visitors, I reported in;¬†that meant¬†talking through parallel slats in an intercom to a woman¬†whose voice was distorted by static. I couldn’t describe¬†this person because, due to translucent glass (and my lack of stature), I couldn’t see much other than dark hair and glasses.
    Another surprise regarding the VPD came in the form of its accessibility. Despite the uniformed attention to detail and the church-like echo of voices in the lobby, there was no sense of keep-away here. I contacted the department ahead of time; I left a message which was responded to in short order. And I was welcomed (with a police escort) into the inner sanctum. (Thank you, VPD!)

As for the other places mentioned above: I took detailed notes¬†on the architecture and layout of the¬†shopping center wherein¬†I have planted¬†a fictional boutique.¬†I ate¬†a delicious salad at the¬†cafe on which I’m basing the restaurant in my story. And I discovered a¬†heritage building whose¬†ivy-covered exterior and dark-paneled interior suit my needs precisely.¬†

Back to my opening questions….¬†Are you¬†writing present-day fiction in a real setting? Are you¬†wondering if you¬†should visit¬†that setting?

My¬†answer… yes! Plan the trip. Immerse yourself in details. Then weave them into your plot.

My best to you,

Annie Signature Light Blue

My Novels. My Research. (Vancouver Bound: Boots on the Ground)

by @AnnieDaylon

shutterstock_212016496I am a multigenre author, born in Newfoundland, living in British Columbia. My novels are reflective of my bi-coastal experience in that they are set on the opposite ends of Canada: Newfoundland or Vancouver. The time element is also extreme: I plunk my work anywhere from the 1920’s to the now. The research methods vary, dictated by setting. The Newfoundland novels catapult me into the past: I read and view everything I can find on the historical events and settings. Here, I am focusing on the Vancouver novels (yes, plural because I’m nearing the end of the second) which are set in present-day and require boots-on-the ground research.

My first Vancouver novel, CASTLES IN THE SAND, is set in 2010 in the west end and, in addition to online research regarding the city and the plight of its homeless, I made two specific trips to the city.

On the first trip, I left the comfort of my west-end hotel at the cusp of dawn on a relatively-warm winter day and hiked the full length of Robson Street. Why? To see, hear, and smell the world as my main character, a homeless man, does. When he observes the pigeons strutting the sidewalk, he notices (because I notice for the first time) that the

  • ‚Äúlittle bastards have red feet.‚ÄĚ

The predominant aroma for him is the smell of coffee (not the smell of ocean air as I had expected.)

  • ‚ÄúI take a deep breath so I can suck in the Starbucks. All the beautiful people carry Starbucks.‚ÄĚ

He hears the day beginning, not just generically in the roar of traffic but specifically:

  • ‚ÄúThe bus engine grumbles‚ĶWhooossssh. Air brakes.‚ÄĚ

  • ‚ÄúWon‚Äôt be long before the bolts on the door of the shoe boutique behind me twist open. Three bolts. Every morning. Like clockwork. Click. Click. Click.‚ÄĚ

¬†That day, I also walked the Vancouver Seawall, toured Gastown, and ate at the Spaghetti Factory, all the while taking notes. My best discovery? At the end of a long day, while walking¬†back to my hotel on Robson Street , I saw a young man in a white, puffy jacket. He was talking to a homeless man. I didn‚Äôt want to interfere but I wanted to eavesdrop, so I strolled past. The young man was saying ‚ÄúLet me help you to a shelter.‚ÄĚ I¬†pinged on that. For my novel, I created a new character, a Good Samaritan, who was dubbed “Marshmallow Man” by my main character.

  • ‚ÄúSome guy in a puffy, white jacket hovers over me. A marshmallow. A goddam talking marshmallow.‚ÄĚ

My second trip to Vancouver was to finalize details. The backstory of my homeless character was that he had lost his home during the real estate crash. I had a specific residence in mind for him, one that I had found in the MLS listings, and walked the area surrounding that very house. I went to the nearby park where my fictional family played. There, I sat on a bench and penned a description of both house and park. I walked the tunnel under the Granville Bridge. And I sat in the foyer of the Central Branch of the Vancouver Public Library where I noticed a pigeon strutting the floor, a pigeon that inspired a caring moment for my homeless character. It was in the library that it occurred to me that all the chattering voices around me melded in to a ghost-like drone, into

  • ‚Äúwhirling ghosts of indiscernible chatter.‚ÄĚ

The effect of all that research was not only that I was better-able to detail the journey of my character but also that I am now better-equipped to notice detail daily. (A bonus for a writer.) 

As for current research… My Work-in-Progress is a crime thriller set in present day Vancouver, again in the west end. I have the characters and the details down, most of them anyway. But I want, once again, to walk in the shoes of my characters. This time I will take the Aquabus to Granville Island, visit a café on the beach, shop at Pacific Centre,  detail heritage buildings in the area, and, most importantly, do some people watching.

In short, in a couple of weeks, I‚Äôm Vancouver bound. Boots on the ground. Can‚Äôt wait! ¬†ūüôā¬†

I invite you to join my author journey: subscribe to blog or newsletter or both! The newsletter contains news about books, links to some blogs, and occasional fun facts about my beloved island of Newfoundland. To sign up, simply place the required information in the spaces provided on the right. Rest assured your email address will not be shared for any reason. eNovel-Round-Logo

My best to you,

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A Tribute to Pat Conroy: “My Reading Life”

by @AnnieDaylon 

My Reading Life“Here is all I ask of a book – give me everything. Everything, and don’t leave out a single word.” ~¬†Pat Conroy

Yesterday¬†I read of the recent passing of author Pat Conroy, probably best know for his novel The Prince of Tides. I love the story, the beauty, the lyricism of¬†Conroy’s fiction but¬†my favorite of his books¬†is a memoir titled My Reading Life.¬†

My Reading Life is Conroy’s view of life through the books he’s read and through the people who introduced him to those books. This work resonated deeply with me: I related¬†to¬†Conroy’s¬†love of words, to his knowledge of Latin, and to his habit of collecting words and phrases and quotes. I was amazed at how much I learned¬†about this¬†author through his reading choices;¬†I even started a list of the books he’d read, thinking that I¬†would visit them all at some point.

During¬†this list-making ¬†process, I searched the book’s title¬†on Pinterest and discovered to my delight that the list¬†already existed!¬†The title of the Pinterest¬†Board?¬†My Reading Life-Pat Conroy.¬†Thank you to Liz Whittaker for creating this board¬†which is not¬†only a gift for readers like myself, but¬†also an outstanding¬†tribute to avid reader and accomplished author, Pat Conroy.¬†

RIP, Pat Conroy.

I invite you to join my author journey: subscribe to blog or newsletter or both! The newsletter contains news about books, links to some blogs, and occasional fun facts about my beloved island of Newfoundland. To sign up, simply place the required information in the spaces provided on the right. Rest assured your email address will not be shared for any reason. 

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Storyboarding with the W Method

by @AnnieDaylon

sTORYBOARDING

Curious about how authors create their novels?

Some write freely, discovering the story as they go along. I do that, to a point. Then, with basic plot, key characters, and some scenes in mind, I create an outline.

I have experimented with different ways of outlining, including the use of note cards, step sheets, the Snowflake Method, and software, all of which are detailed by Robbie Blair in Eight Ways to Outline a Novel.  

The method that works best for me is the Storyboard. It is the most tangible, visual, and accessible way of plotting a story. Sometimes I have used a linear model, simply placing chronological plot points on a straight line.

In my Work-In-Progress, a three-act thriller set in Vancouver, BC, the story takes place over ten days. The details are tight. I want certain characters in a certain place at a certain time and I have to keep track of their every move. Enter: the W Storyboard.

Storyboarding by Mary Carroll Moore

Storyboarding by Mary Carroll Moore

My W Storyboard is based on Mary Carroll Moore’s model which lends itself well to the three-act structure common in the thriller.

The first line of the W‚ÄĒtop to bottom‚ÄĒgives the story setup.

The first low mark represents the first portal or turning point. Once a¬†character crosses that threshold,¬†she must¬†continue the journey. There’s¬†no turning back. Either she can‚Äôt get back or there is nothing to go back to. (To quote fellow writer Brian Rodda, ‚ÄúThe village is burned, the villagers are dead.‚ÄĚ)¬†

Each successive point on the W, as shown in Mary Carroll Moore’s Youtube video, is another portal, another change in direction.

Because I usually know¬†the turning points when I start¬†my storyboard,¬†it’s easy to fill¬†in the portals¬†on the W. After that, I have to get¬†the characters to those portals and that means¬†creating step-by-step details.

Using colorful sticky notes, I write plot points and place them along the lines of the W.  Wonderful things, those sticky notes: I frequently make changes and the notes can be pulled off and popped on easily. (Word of warning: if you plan to use sticky notes, buy the good ones; the cheaper versions tend to lose their stickiness and flit around like butterflies.)

My current storyboard has more than just plot. It includes:

  • Dates of Events, displayed on contrasting ¬†sticky notes;

  • Images of actors who represent the visual type I‚Äôm trying to portray;

  • Character descriptions, detailing¬†height, weight, hair, skin tone, eye color.¬†(These are mere reference points¬†which help avoid simple mistakes, such as a page 27¬†green-eyed character becoming brown-eyed¬†on page 215.)¬†

  • Settings, sometimes written, sometimes images.¬†(One setting in my thriller is a city loft, so I printed out a floor plan that suits my needs and pasted it¬†on the board.)

Mary Carroll Moore states that her W formula is based on a book The Writer’s Time by Kenneth Atchity. The revised version, one which I am about to download, is on Kindle. The new title? Write Time: Guide to the Creative Process, from Vision through Revision-and Beyond. 

If you are an outliner, do you have any outlining tips? 

If you are a pantser, what are your thoughts about outlining?eNovel-Round-Logo

I invite you to join my author journey: subscribe to blog or newsletter or both! The newsletter contains news about books, links to some blogs, and occasional fun facts about my beloved island of Newfoundland. To sign up, simply place the required information in the spaces provided on the right. Rest assured your email address will not be shared for any reason. 

My best to you,
Annie Signature Light Blue

 

 

 

 

Thursday’s Storm by Darrell Duke: Review and Thank You!

by @AnnieDaylon

¬†THURSDAY’S STORM

¬†‚ÄúThe sea stops for nothing.‚ÄĚ

That line from¬†Thursday’s Storm¬†jumped at me because it fed right into my¬†new novel, Of Sea and Seed,¬†which is centered around¬†the¬†1929 Newfoundland tsunami. ¬†My gratitude to Darrell knows no bounds¬†for my work sits¬†squarely on the shoulders of¬†his research:¬†his¬†creative nonfiction account of the nameless hurricane that hit Placentia Bay on August 25, 1927 comes straight from the hearts and souls of the victims‚Äô families.

¬† Thursday's Storm cover image (519x800)¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† Thursday’s Storm
When the crew of the fishing schooner Annie Healy left their home port of Fox Harbour, Placentia Bay, on Wednesday, August 17, 1927, no one could have imagined what fate held in store for them. Times were hard in Newfoundland that year. On shore, wives of the crew were often worked to exhaustion, even more so while their men were at sea. Most had lost parents, siblings, or children to tuberculosis. Each family had at least one tragic story. But when a hurricane struck Placentia Bay on August 25 of that year, a tragedy unlike any they had lived through would unite these people in ways untold. Now, eighty-six years later, the full story of the ill-fated vessel and her crew is told for the first time. The closeness of the crew and their families, and how they worked together to ensure their little community survived, is relived through the memories of children of the crew, stories passed down from their mothers, and reports from the last men to see the schooner afloat.

 

As a native of Placentia, I grabbed this book on Kindle to sneak a glimpse at the lives of those who came before. Then I bought a print copy for my father who remembers the event and the people affected by it.
As an author of a novel set in that era and area, I gobbled up Duke’s details about life at home and on the sea, details that engage the senses and plank the reader down, right there

  • in the kitchen, where ‚Äú‚Ķa round, cast iron pot shivers, its cover clanking like mad from a fit of dancing hot water inside.‚ÄĚ

  • in the garden, where one must lift¬†‚Äú… the clothesline as high as possible out of the reach of the¬†sheep that think nothing of standing on their hind legs and eating a shirt or pair of pants.‚ÄĚ

  • in the fields, where ¬†‚ÄúLong black rats scurry through the wet grass.‚ÄĚ

  • on the wharf, where ‚ÄúEmpty barrels for bait are rolled up splintery wooden planks and onto the deck‚Ķ‚ÄĚ and

  • on the schooner, where ‚ÄúDarkness creeps in from every corner of the earth as the Annie Healy cuts through the black water‚Ķ‚ÄĚ

Darrell Duke’s talents are not limited to the written word. He is a musician who first penned this as a song, The Annie Healy; next came a play, and then this book.
Thursday‚Äôs Storm¬†is a stirring depiction of lives dependent upon, and devastated by, the sea which (and Darrell said it best) “stops for nothing.

Many thanks, Darrell!

Free Short StoryI invite you to join my author journey: subscribe to my newsletter which contains news about books, links to blogs, and occasional fun facts about my beloved island of Newfoundland. Place your first name and email address in the space provided on the right. Rest assured your email address will not be shared for any reason. 

My best to you,

Annie Signature Light Blue

Pick of the Twitter: August, 2015

Pick of the Twitter 005

Looking for writing/marketing tips? Here are my Top Twitter picks for August, 2015:

  1. 7 Tips to Promote Your Book for FREE  via @111publishing

  2. An Updated Guide to the Marketing in the Big 6 Social Networks  via @socialmedia2day

  3. Book Launch Tips for Traditional and Self-Published Authors  @BookBaby

  4. Overwhelmed As An Author? How To Work With Virtual Assistants  @ChrisDucker via @thecreativepenn

  5. How Long Is A Novel? @MaeveMaddox

  6. How to Write Vivid Descriptions by @ChuckSambuchino via @JamesLeeSchmidt

  7. Protagonist and Main Character‚ÄĒ Same Person? The Answer May Transform Your Story!¬†@KMWeiland

  8. ¬†“What Should a Novelist Blog About? Do’s and Don’ts for Author-Bloggers” ¬†by¬†@anneallen¬†via @thecreativepenn

  9. How to Self-Publish Your Book on a Budget by @miralsattar

  10. Have you seen our FREE Author Marketing Checklist? Great guide for authors! @bkmkting

  11. Writing Your First Book: 5 Tasks to Focus on Besides Writing: @thewritelife

  12. Broken, Not Bitter. An Author’s Life with Repetitive Strain Injuries  @thecreativepenn

  1. It Only Gets Harder Once You’re Published¬†¬†by Chuck Wendig

  2. 8 Tips for Writing a Synopsis:  @ceciliaedits via @elizabethscraig

  3. How to Find an Editor as a Self-Published Author via @janeFriedman

  4. Take Your Writing Outdoors: 9 Tips for Successfully Working Outside @thewritelife

  5. Making Bad Things Happen to Good Characters @aliventures

  6. Writing Your Book’s Back-Cover Copy  @JaneFriedman

  7. Basic Formatting of Your Manuscript (Formatting 101) by @JodieRennerEd

Many thanks to Tweeters and Bloggers alike!

A FREE SHORT STORY is yours when you subscribe to my Author Newsletter: simply your first name and email address in the space provided on the upper right. Rest assured that your email address will not be shared. 

My best to you,
Annie Signature Light Blue