Free on Kindle: OF SEA AND SEED

by @AnnieDaylon


Time’s Up for Free Kindle Offer!
Thanks for all those downloads.
Happy Reading!
*****

Limited Time Offer!
FREE KINDLE DOWNLOAD!

Of Sea and Seed October 4, 5, 6, 2017.
Click Here!

Of Sea and Seed
Meet Kathleen Kerrigan, a ghostly family matriarch who is doomed like some ancient mariner to tell and re-tell the story of the lives of three generations of the Kerrigan family as they struggle to survive tsunami, secrets, and betrayal in early twentieth century Newfoundland. “Heaven does not open its gates to a woman of my ilk,” Kathleen tells the reader.
What is she guilty of?

Don’t have a Kindle, you say?? You don’t need one. Simply download the Kindle App and you can read Kindle books on tablets, i-Phones, Computers. To learn how,
Click Here .

Download OF SEA AND SEED now and enjoy your free Kindle read! 

My best to you,

Annie Signature Light Blue

 

 

 

Thursday’s Storm by Darrell Duke: Review and Thank You!

by @AnnieDaylon

 THURSDAY’S STORM

 “The sea stops for nothing.”

That line from Thursday’s Storm jumped at me because it fed right into my new novel, Of Sea and Seed, which is centered around the 1929 Newfoundland tsunami.  My gratitude to Darrell knows no bounds for my work sits squarely on the shoulders of his research: his creative nonfiction account of the nameless hurricane that hit Placentia Bay on August 25, 1927 comes straight from the hearts and souls of the victims’ families.

  Thursday's Storm cover image (519x800)                            Thursday’s Storm
When the crew of the fishing schooner Annie Healy left their home port of Fox Harbour, Placentia Bay, on Wednesday, August 17, 1927, no one could have imagined what fate held in store for them. Times were hard in Newfoundland that year. On shore, wives of the crew were often worked to exhaustion, even more so while their men were at sea. Most had lost parents, siblings, or children to tuberculosis. Each family had at least one tragic story. But when a hurricane struck Placentia Bay on August 25 of that year, a tragedy unlike any they had lived through would unite these people in ways untold. Now, eighty-six years later, the full story of the ill-fated vessel and her crew is told for the first time. The closeness of the crew and their families, and how they worked together to ensure their little community survived, is relived through the memories of children of the crew, stories passed down from their mothers, and reports from the last men to see the schooner afloat.

 

As a native of Placentia, I grabbed this book on Kindle to sneak a glimpse at the lives of those who came before. Then I bought a print copy for my father who remembers the event and the people affected by it.
As an author of a novel set in that era and area, I gobbled up Duke’s details about life at home and on the sea, details that engage the senses and plank the reader down, right there

  • in the kitchen, where “…a round, cast iron pot shivers, its cover clanking like mad from a fit of dancing hot water inside.”

  • in the garden, where one must lift “… the clothesline as high as possible out of the reach of the sheep that think nothing of standing on their hind legs and eating a shirt or pair of pants.”

  • in the fields, where  “Long black rats scurry through the wet grass.”

  • on the wharf, where “Empty barrels for bait are rolled up splintery wooden planks and onto the deck…” and

  • on the schooner, where “Darkness creeps in from every corner of the earth as the Annie Healy cuts through the black water…”

Darrell Duke’s talents are not limited to the written word. He is a musician who first penned this as a song, The Annie Healy; next came a play, and then this book.
Thursday’s Storm is a stirring depiction of lives dependent upon, and devastated by, the sea which (and Darrell said it best) “stops for nothing.

Many thanks, Darrell!

Free Short StoryI invite you to join my author journey: subscribe to my newsletter which contains news about books, links to blogs, and occasional fun facts about my beloved island of Newfoundland. Place your first name and email address in the space provided on the right. Rest assured your email address will not be shared for any reason. 

My best to you,

Annie Signature Light Blue

21 Reading References for Newfoundland Novel Series

by @AnnieDaylon

Newfoundland 001 (640x637)


OF SEA AND SEED, The Kerrigan Chronicles #1 (in progress), is a work of passion, one which I chose because of my deep connection to my native island of Newfoundland. 

What follows is a list of some of my reading for this series, a list which may be of interest to those who are writing about, or have ties to, Newfoundland. Please note: the “Come Home Year” books on the list were printed for specific events and I purchased them in Newfoundland. The red asterisk beside their titles indicates that I could not find a link to them. (If you find one, let me know. Happy to update!)

 

  1. An Armful of Memories* – Bond’s Path-Southeast Come Home Year 2006. Newfoundland: Transcontinental, 2006

  2. Andrieux, J. P. RumRunners. St. John’s, NL: Flanker Press Ltd., 2009.

  3. Cashin, Peter My Fight for Newfoundland. St. John’s, NL: Flanker Press Ltd., 2012.

  4. Collins, Gary. The Gale of 1929. St. John’s, NL: Flanker Press Ltd., 2013.

  5. Collins, Gerard. Finton Moon. St. John’s NL: Killick Press, 2011

  6. Decks Awash, The Placentia Area. Volume 17, No. 3, May-June, 1988.

  7. Duke, Darrell.  Thursday’s Storm: The August Gale. St. John’s, NL: Flanker Press Ltd., 2013.

  8. Fitzgerald, Jack. Newfoundland Disasters. St. John’s, NL: Creative Publishers, 2005.

  9. Fitzgerald, Jack. Strange but True Newfoundland Stories: St. John’s, NL: Creative Publishers, 1989.

  10. Freshwater Come Home Year Book Committee: Freshwater*. Robinson-Blackmore, 2002

  11. Hanrahan, Maura. Tsunami The Newfoundland Tidal Wave Disaster. St. John’s, NL: Flanker Press Ltd., 2006.

  12. Houlihan, Eileen. UPROOTED! The Argentia Story. St, John’s, NL: Creative Publishers, 1992.

  13. Johnston, Wayne. The Colony of Unrequited Dreams. Toronto: Vintage Canada, 1999.

  14. Lannon, Alice and McCarthy, Mike. Fables, Fairies & Folklore of  Newfoundland. St. John’s, NL: Jesperson Press Ltd., 1991.

  15. Neary, Peter.  Newfoundland in the North Atlantic World 1929-1949 Kingston and Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1988.

  16. Neary, Peter, Ed. WHITE TIE AND DECORATIONS Sir John and Lady Hope Simpson in Newfoundland, 1934-1936.Toronto: University of Toronto Press,1996.

  17. Olive Power, Ed. Bridging Places & People from Big Barasway to Ship Harbour*. Placentia: Placentia Intertown Come Home Year, 2012. shutterstock_118816366

  18. Rompkey, Bill Ed. St. John’s and the Battle of the Atlantic. St. John’s, NL: Flanker Press, 2009.

  19. Strowbridge, Nellie P. The Newfoundland Tongue. St. John’s, NL: Flanker Press Ltd., 2008.

  20. Young, Ron. Dictionary of Newfoundland and Labrador. St. John’s, NL: Downhome Publishing Inc., 2006.

  21. Young, Ron, Ed. Downhome Memories. St. John’s, NL: Downhome Publishing Inc., 2005.

Free Short Story
For news about books and blogs and to receive a FREE SHORT STORY, please subscribe to my newsletter. Just place your first name and email address in the space provided on the right. Rest assured that your email address will not be shared.

My best to you,

Annie Signature Light Blue

Newfoundland Dialect: Derivation and Appreciation

by @AnnieDaylon

shutterstock_118816366

How’s she goin’, b‘ys?
I have just published a novel set on the island of Newfoundland–OF SEA AND SEED— and am often asked about the dialect of that part of Canada. The language is no doubt unique. A while back, I wrote this post about  its source. If you have
 nare click nor clue about it, here (speaking strictly from me own neck of the woods which is Placentia), is the rights of it:

The dialect is owing to early settlers who hailed from Ireland, England and France. Groups arrived and settled together.  Hemmed in by sea, no roads on land, they didn’t shift much.

Placentia, NL, about 135 km (85 miles) west of St. John's.

Placentia, NL, about 135 km (85 miles) west of St. John’s.

Over the years, dialect evolved, due to:
1) World War II: An influx of American military personnel slowed the lilt of the language and added words such as ‘dime’ and ‘boyfriend’;
2) Resettlement: As fishing declined, people shifted from outports to larger areas;
3) Emigration: People moved away; some came back, talking large.
4) Immigration: People brought in new accents; and
5) Technology: The world is online and satellite TV is all over da place, b’y. Everyone watches the same shows and movies and, subsequently, speaks similar language.

Despite all of the changes, despite the fact that I now live in British Columbia,  I cherish opportunities to hear Newfoundland dialect; those occur thanks to CBC shows such as Land and Sea, The Rick Mercer Report, This Hour Has 22 Minutes, and Republic of Doyle. But nothing replaces the real thing, b’y, and every year or two, when I make the twelve-hour trip from Abbotsford, BC to St. John’s, NL, I look forward to the sound that is distinctly Newfoundland.

On such a trip couple of years back, I dashed from the St. John’s airport, filled my lungs with fresh air, hopped into the first available cab and leaned back, ears at the ready. When the driver opened his mouth, his accent fell out and my heart fell to me boots.  He was Eastern European. What the heck? Holy Lord tunderin’!  Was the dialect disappearing altogether?

I allow I was disappointed, and I had a like to forget about the whole thing. But I didn’t. I headed to the DownHome Shop and O’Brien’s Music Store. I listened to VOCM radio in the mornings. I heard smatterings of dialect but, by the last day of my ten-day trip, I resigned myself to the fact that the accent was dissipating. What was the world coming to at all?

A sense of loss pervaded as I rang up a taxi service to schedule my trip to the airport.

Newfoundland 001 (640x637)

Eastern Canada’s island of Newfoundland, Province of Newfoundland and Labrador

Where are ye at, me love?” asked the dispatcher.

With my heart fluttering to beat the band, I told him.

Sure, me darlin’, ’tis not us you wants now at all.”

I was some flummoxed (and right delighted.) “Excuse me?”

“Well, it’s like this. We’re way too far across town. Call buddy over at City Wide. He’ll get you there, guaranteed.”

So I thanked him profusely and called buddy.

The next morning, the driver arrived early. When I complimented him on his promptness, he said, “Ducky, when I has to be some place, I shows up like a bullet!”

I smiled the rest of the way to the airport. I was still smiling when the jet pitched in British Columbia half a day later. What a wicked time I had! 🙂

My best to you and long may your big jib draw!

Annie Signature Light Blue